We Repair and

Restore Old or

Antique Clocks

 

Ingraham 8 day marble clock.

Ingraham 8 Day

Marble Clock

 

Atmos Table Clock

Atmos Table Clock

 

Beautifull French brass table clock.

Brass Table Clock

 

Modern Brass Mantel Clock with Westminster Chime.

Brass Mantel Clock

 

Lack of Service caused these severly worn Pivots,
 had to be drilled out and new Pivots fitted.

Worn Pivots

-----------------

Sad Repair Work!

Punched bushing hole,how could the repairer do this! 
This Grandfather clock is over 100 years old.

Hammered Bushing

This brass plate damaged for life due to sody workmanship.

The clocks value is

greatly diminished

by this.

Clock Repairs and Maintenance

Regular maintenance of your timepiece is important, especially old mechanical clocks.

Service implies that everything about the clock is working correctly. It usually only involves stripping, cleaning, reassembling and lubrication. This is the cheapest option but by no means the best way to go as worn components could become a problem in the future. I suggest that once dissembled the clock repairer inspects the movement thoroughly to ascertain the extent of wear and take the appropriate action.

Repair means the clock has stopped due to  mechanical failure and this usually involves a service as well as replacing, repairing or remanufacturing the worn or broken components in the clock.

Restoration is similar to repair but usually requires much finer detail to the work done, as you don't want  a 100 year old clock to look as thought it was made yesterday, it usually requires the movement, weights, pendulum as well as the case be restored. I suggest, leave the clock as is so it retains its authenticity and age, but that decision must be made by the clock owner.

Decision to Repair: To repair a clock properly takes time and skill, and that costs money. The customer needs to consider whether to repair, scrap, replace, sell, or just use it as decoration.                                           

NB: If the clock has no sentimental value then the decision should simply be based on affordability, on the other hand, sentimental value is a much more important aspect to consider, also considering that these timepieces are usually irreplaceable.                         

NB: The cost of the repair does not necessarily relate to the value of the clock.  For example, the work involved in repairing the movement (mechanism) of a mass produced later model timepiece is  similar to that of repairing the movement of a much older timepiece. The facts are, the newer the timepiece the more problematic certain clocks can be to repair, this is because some materials used are of a lesser quality than those used in past eras. This results in much greater wear over a shorter time period.

NB: I emphasize again, regular servicing every five years or so will keep your clock ticking. (You would not let you motor vehicle run without a service, so why your clock, and it runs none stop)

Lubrication: Over time the oil and grease dries out, wear sets in and eventually  the clock stops.  However, before this occurs the dust that is trapped in the oil forms an abrasive paste which then causes unnecessary wear.  Therefore do not wait until the clock stops before servicing it.   A bad practice is to simply re-oil the clock without stripping and cleaning  In which case, the abrasion remains and the wear continues.

Worn pivots and bushes: The correct method of repair is to polish the pivots thereby removing any scoring. If the pivot is so badly worn that removing the scoring would make the pivot too weak then the pivot has to be cut off, the shaft drilled, and a new pivot fitted. This is one consequence of not servicing a clock regularly, I recommend every five to seven years. Once the pivots are sized the new bushings can be fitted. The worn bushing holes must never be punched to compensate for the wear, this is bad workmanship and destroys the aesthetics and value of any clock.

Wheels and pinions:  Wheels and pinions are the gears inside the clock movement.  The wheels are the larger and are usually made of brass and the pinions are steel. There are two main problems associated with wheels and pinions, mainly wear and broken teeth.  Ironically here wear is often caused by lubrication. Clock wheels and pinions must never be oiled, you ask why? The problem is that dust becomes trapped in the oil to form an abrasive paste, the particles of dust become embedded in the softer brass and cause the steel pinion to wear. Very bad as now new gears have to be made, that's really time consuming and may make the repair cost unaffordable. Therefore DO NOT spray lubrication into the clock movement have it serviced by a professional clockmaker, repairer, you have been warned.

Clock Repairs are done by The Clockmaker at Metro Clock Repair.  

There are many more problems and repair procedures, to numerous to notate here, I would have to write a book and this is only intended as a short guide to clock owners. There are however  numerous websites with a vast array of information concerning clock repair available on the web.

Battery life of a timepiece depends on the age of the timepiece as well as battery type and quality, as well as its functions and how often those functions are used. A battery in a brand new quartz timepiece may last up to four years. As the timepiece ages the mechanism becomes worn and power consumption may increases (this is why factory installed batteries can last longer). Typically replacement batteries last between one and two years. It is possible for a battery to last longer, but this is not a safe practice as batteries can leak thus destroying your timepiece, it is recommended to replace the battery every two years to avoid potential damages. Some timepieces may also have more than one battery.

The term 'Waterproof' was used previously, but has since been deemed misleading. No watch can ever be classified as waterproof, only water resistant.

Modern water resistant watches are rated by depth, the higher the rating, the more water pressure a watch can withstand. Depths range from 30M to 600M. Water resistant watches are always labelled 'Water Resistant' on the back case. Some watches may also have their depth rating displayed on the front dial.

It is important to note that the gaskets in a watch deteriorate over time and require regular maintenance. Push buttons for the various functions of modern watches can be a serious problem as they age. Most manufacturers recommend watches with a 100M depth rating or above to be resealed and tested every year, especially important after replacing the battery.

No watch should be used in the shower or bath as there are chemicals about that can cause the seals to perish, also watches are rated water resistant in cold water only. Temperature changes cause watch gaskets to expand and contract, potentially breaching the seal.

Watch repairs are done by our Watchmaker at Metro Clock Repair.

Now that you have the facts bring us your "Timepiece" and let us assess its condition. You can then, with peace of mind, decide wether it's worth repairing or not!

 

Clock Repairs and Maintenance

Regular maintenance of your timepiece is vital, especially old mechanical clocks.

Service implies that everything about the clock is working correctly. It usually only involves stripping, cleaning, reassembling and lubrication. This is the cheapest option but by no means the best way to go as worn components could become a problem in the future. I suggest that once dissembled the clock repairer inspects the movement thoroughly to ascertain the extent of wear and take the appropriate action.

Repair means the clock has stopped due to  mechanical failure and this usually involves a service as well as replacing, repairing or remanufacturing the worn or broken components in the clock.

Restoration is similar to repair but usually requires much finer detail to the work done, as you don't want  a 100 year old clock to look as thought it was made yesterday, it usually requires the movement, weights, pendulum as well as the case be restored. I suggest, leave the clock as is so it retains its authenticity and age, but that decision must be made by the clock owner.

Decision to Repair: To repair a clock properly takes time and skill, and that costs money. The customer needs to consider whether to repair, scrap, replace, sell, or just use it as decoration.                                           

NB: If the clock has no sentimental value then the decision should simply be based on affordability, on the other hand, sentimental value is a much more important aspect to consider, also considering that these timepieces are usually irreplaceable.                         

NB: The cost of the repair does not necessarily relate to the value of the clock.  For example, the work involved in repairing the movement (mechanism) of a mass produced later model timepiece is  similar to that of repairing the movement of a much older timepiece. The facts are, the newer the timepiece the more problematic certain clocks can be to repair, this is because some materials used are of a lesser quality than those used in past eras. This results in much greater wear over a shorter time period.

NB: I emphasize again, regular servicing every five years or so will keep your clock ticking. (You would not let you motor vehicle run without a service, so why your clock, and it runs none stop)

Lubrication: Over time the oil and grease dries out, wear sets in and eventually  the clock stops.  However, before this occurs the dust that is trapped in the oil forms an abrasive paste which then causes unnecessary wear.  Therefore do not wait until the clock stops before servicing it.   A bad practice is to simply re-oil the clock without stripping and cleaning  In which case, the abrasion remains and the wear continues.

Worn pivots and bushes: The correct method of repair is to polish the pivots thereby removing any scoring. If the pivot is so badly worn that removing the scoring would make the pivot too weak then the pivot has to be cut off, the shaft drilled, and a new pivot fitted. This is one consequence of not servicing a clock regularly, I recommend every five to seven years. Once the pivots are sized the new bushings can be fitted. The worn bushing holes must never be punched to compensate for the wear, this is bad workmanship and destroys the aesthetics and value of any clock.

Wheels and pinions:  Wheels and pinions are the gears inside the clock movement.  The wheels are the larger and are usually made of brass and the pinions are steel. There are two main problems associated with wheels and pinions, mainly wear and broken teeth.  Ironically here wear is often caused by lubrication. Clock wheels and pinions must never be oiled, you ask why? The problem is that dust becomes trapped in the oil to form an abrasive paste, the particles of dust become embedded in the softer brass and cause the steel pinion to wear. Very bad as now new gears have to be made, that's really time consuming and may make the repair cost unaffordable. Therefore DO NOT spray lubrication into the clock movement have it serviced by a professional clockmaker, repairer, you have been warned.

Clock Repairs are done by The Clockmaker at Metro Clock Repair.  

There are many more problems and repair procedures, to numerous to notate here, I would have to write a book and this is only intended as a short guide to clock owners. There are however  numerous websites with a vast array of information concerning clock repair available on the web.

Battery life of a timepiece depends on the age of the timepiece as well as battery type and quality, as well as its functions and how often those functions are used. A battery in a brand new quartz timepiece may last up to four years. As the timepiece ages the mechanism becomes worn and power consumption may increases (this is why factory installed batteries can last longer). Typically replacement batteries last between one and two years. It is possible for a battery to last longer, but this is not a safe practice as batteries can leak thus destroying your timepiece, it is recommended to replace the battery every two years to avoid potential damages. Some timepieces may also have more than one battery.

The term 'Waterproof' was used previously, but has since been deemed misleading. No watch can ever be classified as waterproof, only water resistant.

Modern water resistant watches are rated by depth, the higher the rating, the more water pressure a watch can withstand. Depths range from 30M to 600M. Water resistant watches are always labelled 'Water Resistant' on the back case. Some watches may also have their depth rating displayed on the front dial.

It is important to note that the gaskets in a watch deteriorate over time and require regular maintenance. Push buttons for the various functions of modern watches can be a serious problem as they age. Most manufacturers recommend watches with a 100M depth rating or above to be resealed and tested every year, especially important after replacing the battery.

No watch should be used in the shower or bath as there are chemicals about that can cause the seals to perish, also watches are rated water resistant in cold water only. Temperature changes cause watch gaskets to expand and contract, potentially breaching the seal.

Watch repairs are done by our Watchmaker at Metro Clock Repair.

Now that you have the facts bring us your "Timepiece" and let us assess its condition. You can then, with peace of mind, decide wether it's worth repairing or not!

 

Clock Repairs and Maintenance

Regular maintenance of your timepiece is vital, especially old mechanical clocks.

Service implies that everything about the clock is working correctly. It usually only involves stripping, cleaning, reassembling and lubrication. This is the cheapest option but by no means the best way to go as worn components could become a problem in the future. I suggest that once dissembled the clock repairer inspects the movement thoroughly to ascertain the extent of wear and take the appropriate action.

Repair means the clock has stopped due to  mechanical failure and this usually involves a service as well as replacing, repairing or remanufacturing the worn or broken components in the clock.

Restoration is similar to repair but usually requires much finer detail to the work done, as you don't want  a 100 year old clock to look as thought it was made yesterday, it usually requires the movement, weights, pendulum as well as the case be restored. I suggest, leave the clock as is so it retains its authenticity and age, but that decision must be made by the clock owner.

Decision to Repair: To repair a clock properly takes time and skill, and that costs money. The customer needs to consider whether to repair, scrap, replace, sell, or just use it as decoration.                                           

NB: If the clock has no sentimental value then the decision should simply be based on affordability, on the other hand, sentimental value is a much more important aspect to consider, also considering that these timepieces are usually irreplaceable.                         

NB: The cost of the repair does not necessarily relate to the value of the clock.  For example, the work involved in repairing the movement (mechanism) of a mass produced later model timepiece is  similar to that of repairing the movement of a much older timepiece. The facts are, the newer the timepiece the more problematic certain clocks can be to repair, this is because some materials used are of a lesser quality than those used in past eras. This results in much greater wear over a shorter time period.

NB: I emphasize again, regular servicing every five years or so will keep your clock ticking. (You would not let you motor vehicle run without a service, so why your clock, and it runs none stop)

Lubrication: Over time the oil and grease dries out, wear sets in and eventually  the clock stops.  However, before this occurs the dust that is trapped in the oil forms an abrasive paste which then causes unnecessary wear.  Therefore do not wait until the clock stops before servicing it.   A bad practice is to simply re-oil the clock without stripping and cleaning  In which case, the abrasion remains and the wear continues.

Worn pivots and bushes: The correct method of repair is to polish the pivots thereby removing any scoring. If the pivot is so badly worn that removing the scoring would make the pivot too weak then the pivot has to be cut off, the shaft drilled, and a new pivot fitted. This is one consequence of not servicing a clock regularly, I recommend every five to seven years. Once the pivots are sized the new bushings can be fitted. The worn bushing holes must never be punched to compensate for the wear, this is bad workmanship and destroys the aesthetics and value of any clock.

Wheels and pinions:  Wheels and pinions are the gears inside the clock movement.  The wheels are the larger and are usually made of brass and the pinions are steel. There are two main problems associated with wheels and pinions, mainly wear and broken teeth.  Ironically here wear is often caused by lubrication. Clock wheels and pinions must never be oiled, you ask why? The problem is that dust becomes trapped in the oil to form an abrasive paste, the particles of dust become embedded in the softer brass and cause the steel pinion to wear. Very bad as now new gears have to be made, that's really time consuming and may make the repair cost unaffordable. Therefore DO NOT spray lubrication into the clock movement have it serviced by a professional clockmaker, repairer, you have been warned.

Clock Repairs are done by The Clockmaker at Metro Clock Repair.  

There are many more problems and repair procedures, to numerous to notate here, I would have to write a book and this is only intended as a short guide to clock owners. There are however  numerous websites with a vast array of information concerning clock repair available on the web.

Battery life of a timepiece depends on the age of the timepiece as well as battery type and quality, as well as its functions and how often those functions are used. A battery in a brand new quartz timepiece may last up to four years. As the timepiece ages the mechanism becomes worn and power consumption may increases (this is why factory installed batteries can last longer). Typically replacement batteries last between one and two years. It is possible for a battery to last longer, but this is not a safe practice as batteries can leak thus destroying your timepiece, it is recommended to replace the battery every two years to avoid potential damages. Some timepieces may also have more than one battery.

The term 'Waterproof' was used previously, but has since been deemed misleading. No watch can ever be classified as waterproof, only water resistant.

Modern water resistant watches are rated by depth, the higher the rating, the more water pressure a watch can withstand. Depths range from 30M to 600M. Water resistant watches are always labelled 'Water Resistant' on the back case. Some watches may also have their depth rating displayed on the front dial.

It is important to note that the gaskets in a watch deteriorate over time and require regular maintenance. Push buttons for the various functions of modern watches can be a serious problem as they age. Most manufacturers recommend watches with a 100M depth rating or above to be resealed and tested every year, especially important after replacing the battery.

No watch should be used in the shower or bath as there are chemicals about that can cause the seals to perish, also watches are rated water resistant in cold water only. Temperature changes cause watch gaskets to expand and contract, potentially breaching the seal.

Watch repairs are done by our Watchmaker at Metro Clock Repair.

Now that you have the facts bring us your "Timepiece" and let us assess its condition. You can then, with peace of mind, decide wether it's worth repairing or not!

 

Antique wall clock | Restored by The Clockmaker

Antique 100 year plus

old Wall Clock

 

Großvater Standuhr:  Repairs Done By The Clockmaker

Grandfather Clock

Clocks Repaired by
The Clockmaker

Antique wall clock | Restored by The Clockmaker

Antique 100 year plus
old Wall Clock

Gustav Becker weight driven wall clock | Repairs done by The Clockmaker

Gustav Becker Weight
Driven Wall Clock

Großvater Standuhr:  Repairs Done By The Clockmaker

Grandfather Clock